How to Avoid Crashing in Corners

In this article, I will outline the cornering crash sequence that often leads to the dreaded single-vehicle motorcycle crash, aka “running wide in a corner”.

We know that proper lane position, effective visual acuity and strong countersteering skills are crucial for successfully negotiating a curve. However, once the crash sequence starts it’s difficult to halt the cascade of mistakes that lead to cornering mishaps.

Getting in over your head sucks!

The top 10 Cornering Crash Factors

Things often start out okay as you approach the turn, but any lack of cornering confidence sets up the typical cornering crash sequence.

Once the crash sequence begins, it is exponentially more difficult to execute the actions needed to negotiate the curve.

1. Too Fast Entry- You approach and enter the turn faster than your personal level of comfort with leaning or the capability of your bike. Don’t blame the corner. You messed up. Often, a more competent rider could have made the turn with no drama.

2. Poor lane position at turn entry- You enter the turn too close to the inside instead of the outside. Nervous riders who are afraid of running wide often approach corners in the middle-to-inside, making the turn sharper.

3. Narrow angle of view- An inside lane position also limits the view into and beyond the turn.

4. Poor turn-in timing- Countersteering too early or too late and with either too strong or too weak handlebar inputs leads to problems at the exit. (Nervous riders turn in too early).

5. Apex too early- Turn in too early and the bike will be pointed toward the oncoming lane or the edge of the road at the exit. This then requires a second turn input to stay on the road.

6. Mind freeze- When it becomes apparent that things aren’t going well, fear and doubt take over, leading to a shift into survival mode. (We can’t function well in this state).

7. Target fixation- Panic causes rider to look down and at the oncoming car or the guardrail. (Humans are programmed to look at what we fear).

8. Muscle paralysis- Panic leads to ineffective or non existent countersteering and the bike feels like it won’t turn. (It’s common to put pressure on both left and right handgrips as you brace for the worst).

9. Ineffective body position- Poor body position isn’t the most significant cornering failure, but relying on your body to turn the bike (without countersteering) is disastrous. Some riders lean in to try and coax the bike to turn more, while others counterweight for fear of leaning beyond their comfort level.

10. Panic braking- With panic comes the unwillingness to lean more. In response, humans tend to grab the brakes when panicked. Adding significant brake force when leaned leads to traction loss.

What to Do

So, there you have it. Of course, there are other factors that may come into play that aren’t listed here, but this is the most common cornering crash sequence. You can also overly this same sequence to most other crashes where one domino falls and others tumble quickly.

Understand that arresting the sequence is quite difficult once it has been activated. So, enter turns a bit slower and continually learn and consciously practice expert cornering techniques on every ride to prevent this from happening to you!

How to Corner Better

There are several ways to become better at cornering to reduce the likelihood of crashing in a corner. Here are a few options:

Non-Sportbike Track Training Days and regular Sportbike Track Days

Advanced parking Lot Courses

Parking Lot Practice on your own.


This is a rider who sucks at cornering.

Read more:

How not to Suck at Cornering

How not to suck at braking

Vision-Facebook Live

How to Avoid Cornering Panic


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